Span

Spring 2016  |  2 1/2 Month Long Project  |  Completed in a group of 2

This shop project focused on designing a structure that was aesthetically pleasing, but could also support weight. We were given two wooden boxes that were to be placed 48 inches apart, and we had to design a constructible project that spanned them. No glue was used. Instead, joinery had to be created to hold the pieces together.  

My project explored how placing pieces at alternating acute angles causes them to be stronger then if they were perpendicular. For example, we have the sticks on either side going in opposite directions and the planar pieces are held by the sticks at alternating 10 degree angles.

 
Our final span was displayed in the CFA building lobby on campus

Our final span was displayed in the CFA building lobby on campus

Before getting approval to build our project, we had to complete a series of shop drawings

Before getting approval to build our project, we had to complete a series of shop drawings

We kept our design to a simple kit of 2 parts- the sticks and the planar pieces. Since the planes had alternating angles, we technically had two different versions of them.

We kept our design to a simple kit of 2 parts- the sticks and the planar pieces. Since the planes had alternating angles, we technically had two different versions of them.

Teams were allowed to manipulate the given boxes. Some chose not to. We decided to cut into ours and have the pieces extend beyond them, to give the feeling that the span was passing through the boxes.

Teams were allowed to manipulate the given boxes. Some chose not to. We decided to cut into ours and have the pieces extend beyond them, to give the feeling that the span was passing through the boxes.

An assembly drawing showing how the sticks and planes connect.

An assembly drawing showing how the sticks and planes connect.

An assembly drawing showing how the sticks fit into the boxes.

An assembly drawing showing how the sticks fit into the boxes.

A closer look at the criss-crossing patterns made by the final model.

A closer look at the criss-crossing patterns made by the final model.